doodlemancy:

My counselor suggested that I imagine my anxiety as a monster, and to imagine myself chasing it around, kicking it, stomping on it, etc. whenever I’m defying it. It’s been very helpful.

(via finickyfennec)

Why is it not helpful to say “not all men are like that”? For lots of reasons. For one, women know this. They already know not every man is a rapist, or a murderer, or violent. They don’t need you to tell them.

Second, it’s defensive. When people are defensive, they aren’t listening to the other person; they’re busy thinking of ways to defend themselves. I watched this happen on Twitter, over and again.

Third, the people saying it aren’t furthering the conversation, they’re sidetracking it. The discussion isn’t about the men who aren’t a problem. (Though, I’ll note, it can be. I’ll get back to that.) Instead of being defensive and distracting from the topic at hand, try staying quiet for a while and actually listening to what the thousands upon thousands of women discussing this are saying.

Fourth—and this is important, so listen carefully—when a woman is walking down the street, or on a blind date, or, yes, in an elevator alone, she doesn’t know which group you’re in. You might be the potential best guy ever in the history of history, but there’s no way for her to know that. A fraction of men out there are most definitely not in that group. Which are you? Inside your head you know, but outside your head it’s impossible to.

This is the reality women deal with all the time.

- #NotAllMen: How Not to Derail Discussions of Women’s Issues (via http://www.slate.com/)

(via misandry-mermaid)

ami-angelwings:

profoundboner:

bpdlevi:

"you’re obsessed with your mental illness"

i know right? it’s almost like it impacts every part of my life

"it’s all in your head"

I know right? it’s almost like it’s a mental illness

"why do you let it affect you and stop you from being able to do things?"

I know right? It’s almost like it’s an ACTUAL ILLNESS

misandry-mermaid:

misandry-mermaid:

conceivethedream:

jessehimself:

 

Hero

What. Is. Her. Name.

Thanks to a follower for finding this: Her name is Venus Green.
From this article: 
In July 2009, Green’s grandson, Tallie, was shot and wounded. Tallie said he was shot at a convenience store, but police insisted it happened inside Green’s house and that the shooter was either Tallie or Green.
"Police kept questioning him. They wouldn’t let the ambulance attendant treat him," Green said. "So, I got up and said, ‘Sir, would you please let the attendants treat him? He’s in pain,’" Green said.
Green said the officer said to her, “Oh, you did it, come on, let’s go inside. I’ll prove where that blood is. You did it.”
Police wanted to go the basement, where Tallie lived, but Green refused on the basis that the police did not have a warrant.
"I said, ‘No, you don’t have a warrant. You don’t go down in my house like that. He wasn’t shot in here.’" Green said the officer replied, "I’m going to find that gun. I’m going to prove that you did it."
A struggle ensued between a male officer and Green.
"He dragged me, threw me across the chair, put handcuffs on me and just started calling me the ‘b’ name. He ridiculed me," Green said.
An officer went into the basement and Green locked him inside.
"She locked the door, the basement door. She basically took matters into her own hands," Nilson said.
"This was my private home, and if I latched it, that was my prerogative because he had no search warrant to go in my basement. So, I had to right to latch it," Green said.
Green said she suffered a separated shoulder in the scuffle, and she sued the Police Department for assault and violations of her rights.
"I was once a block watcher, department head of a high school. (I’ve) been around education for over 50 years. (I’m a) law-abiding citizen, I’ve never been arrested, I paid my taxes, owned my home, my husband died 34 years ago. (I) raised my son and I have been brutally abused," Green said. "I feel like the Police Department needs to go back to school."

misandry-mermaid:

misandry-mermaid:

conceivethedream:

jessehimself:

 

Hero

What. Is. Her. Name.

Thanks to a follower for finding this: Her name is Venus Green.

From this article:

In July 2009, Green’s grandson, Tallie, was shot and wounded. Tallie said he was shot at a convenience store, but police insisted it happened inside Green’s house and that the shooter was either Tallie or Green.

"Police kept questioning him. They wouldn’t let the ambulance attendant treat him," Green said. "So, I got up and said, ‘Sir, would you please let the attendants treat him? He’s in pain,’" Green said.

Green said the officer said to her, “Oh, you did it, come on, let’s go inside. I’ll prove where that blood is. You did it.”

Police wanted to go the basement, where Tallie lived, but Green refused on the basis that the police did not have a warrant.

"I said, ‘No, you don’t have a warrant. You don’t go down in my house like that. He wasn’t shot in here.’" Green said the officer replied, "I’m going to find that gun. I’m going to prove that you did it."

A struggle ensued between a male officer and Green.

"He dragged me, threw me across the chair, put handcuffs on me and just started calling me the ‘b’ name. He ridiculed me," Green said.

An officer went into the basement and Green locked him inside.

"She locked the door, the basement door. She basically took matters into her own hands," Nilson said.

"This was my private home, and if I latched it, that was my prerogative because he had no search warrant to go in my basement. So, I had to right to latch it," Green said.

Green said she suffered a separated shoulder in the scuffle, and she sued the Police Department for assault and violations of her rights.

"I was once a block watcher, department head of a high school. (I’ve) been around education for over 50 years. (I’m a) law-abiding citizen, I’ve never been arrested, I paid my taxes, owned my home, my husband died 34 years ago. (I) raised my son and I have been brutally abused," Green said. "I feel like the Police Department needs to go back to school."

comicsalliance:

A BELATED BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION OF THE GREAT RAMONA FRADON
By Patrick A. Reed
Ramona Fradon is one of the great living legends of comics, a creator with an instantly recognizable style who has worked on some of DC Comics‘ best-loved series — and co-created a few classic characters along the way. Her crisp, lyrical line has elevated every book she’s touched over her six-and-a-half decades in the business, and her work continues to influence and inspire creators to this day.
Fradon graduated from Parsons School Of Design in 1950, and began working at DC almost immediately, pencilling the Shining Knight backup story in Adventure Comics #165 – and when that feature was replaced by Aquaman two issues later, Fradon found her first signature character.
To mark the occasion of Fradon’s recent birthday, we’ve compiled a small gallery of her art, and assembled a few friends to join us in celebrating her life and work.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

A BELATED BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION OF THE GREAT RAMONA FRADON

By Patrick A. Reed

Ramona Fradon is one of the great living legends of comics, a creator with an instantly recognizable style who has worked on some of DC Comics‘ best-loved series — and co-created a few classic characters along the way. Her crisp, lyrical line has elevated every book she’s touched over her six-and-a-half decades in the business, and her work continues to influence and inspire creators to this day.

Fradon graduated from Parsons School Of Design in 1950, and began working at DC almost immediately, pencilling the Shining Knight backup story in Adventure Comics #165 – and when that feature was replaced by Aquaman two issues later, Fradon found her first signature character.

To mark the occasion of Fradon’s recent birthday, we’ve compiled a small gallery of her art, and assembled a few friends to join us in celebrating her life and work.

READ MORE

Anonymous said: You black people need to stop victimizing yourselves. You're not the only ones that have gotten treated like that so get over it. Maybe if black people weren't so fucking violent this wouldn't be happening.

gaycroissant:

first of all, if you’re going to come and claim an argument, especially while being anonymous, you’re gonna have to talk to me with support, common sense, validity, and rationality because 1) i’m not stupid, 2) i’m a student of critical and valid thinking, 3) i don’t want to waste my time arguing with someone who’s ignorant, incapable of rationality and the ability to think outside of what their tv and government has taught them

but damn i’m pretty happy my posts triggered you into sending me this dumbass message lol and since i just came outta my critical thinking class, i’m ready to go off

starting off, idk what kind of fucking world you live in or what your level of common sense and rationality is (although it does seem pretty damn low) but, walking down the street with a sandwich in your hand is not an act of violence nor is it an action of self victimization. nor is walking down the street with your friend, and nor is holding a toy gun in a toy store. none of those incidences include any attempt of violence nor is it an excuse to shoot 9 or 16 times at any of those unarmed innocents. no black person, nor any individual of any race/ethnicity wants to be a victim, but the problem is that POC don’t get to choose whether they are/aren’t a victim to white supremacy in america. do you really think that 18 year old was walking down the street with his sandwich in his hand thinking “damn man i can’t wait to get shot 16 times in front of my own mom for holding this food on the sidewalk” i don’t fucking think so.  when you have a white cops killing an innocent/unarmed black person every 28 hours, that is an act of violence. stop trying to make up excuses for your racist and disgusting way of thinking. open your mind and take a look at what is happening around you. this isn’t about self victimization, this is simply due to racism and white supremacy, and just in case your ignorant brain doesn’t know what white supremacy is; it’s the belief that white people are superior to those of all other races, especially the black race, and should therefore dominate society.

secondly, every single black person is aware they we are not the only group of people who have been treated like worthless animals, especially the blacks in america. we’re aware hispanics, muslims, arabs, asians, and just basically anyone who isn’t white are degraded as well. i mean for fucks sakes, everyone of them is aware that they’re not even living on a land of peace. that country you and i live in and like to call “america” and “canada” are not ours nor do we really belong to love on them. it’s just that, as usual, a bunch of white people thought they were superior and decided to rape, slaughter, and dehumanize the natives in order to take away someone’s land to be able to “own” it and control it for commerce and other social factors. and as we speak, the continent of africa and many lands in the middle east have and still are being colonized and stolen from by white rich men because of the lands’ rich resources. that is an act of violence. 

"Maybe if black people weren’t so fucking violent this wouldn’t be happening." i hate to break it to you but white people are also violent. have you never heard of the KKK? have you not heard that 86% of white victims are killed by another white person? or that 6.5 million white people have been arrested in america in 2011 compared to the 2.6 blacks? white people are violent too and always want to be portrayed as innocent and correct as possible but truth is you’re too ignorant to admit your own racist ways of thinking. and before you attack me on calling you racist, read this

"The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything." [x]

anyways, i hope you learned something today and hopefully you start altering your ignorant way of thinking for the sake of this humanity. 

spockisinthetardis:

welcome-my-peasants:

Hey guys, you get it? It’s pumpkin pi.

GUYS

spockisinthetardis:

welcome-my-peasants:

Hey guys, you get it? It’s pumpkin pi.

GUYS

(via robinade)

wolfwithafoxtail:

People think feminism means that there’s a group of women somewhere that want to take trousers with pockets away from men and give them to women, and give men trousers with fake pockets, while in reality feminism is the general idea that everyone should have trousers with pockets, because pockets are awesome.

This should be reblogged pretty much constantly.